CHOOSING THE RIGHT SUPPLEMENT

CHOOSING THE RIGHT SUPPLEMENT

CHOOSING THE GOOD / RIGHT SUPPLEMENT FOR YOUR HEALTH NEEDS
CHOOSING THE GOOD / RIGHT SUPPLEMENT FOR YOUR HEALTH NEEDS

HOW TO CHOOSE A GOOD SUPPLEMENT THAT MEETS WITH YOUR HEALTH NEEDS?

Before you start taking any herbal medicine or supplement be sure you assess your vitamin needs. Consider your lifestyle and diet. Look for nutritional deficiencies in your diet. There are some medical tests you can do to find out your vitamin or nutritional deficiencies or do research on possible remedies for health symptoms you may have.

It has been well documented that our food supply isn’t as rich in nutrients as it once was. This is due to several factors including mono-crop farming, depleted soil, earlier harvest for longer transports and the varieties being grown. Ideally we take supplements with the intention of supplementing our existing diet.

Environmental toxins and stress can also contribute to health issues.

 

TIPS ON HOW TO PICK A GOOD SUPPLEMENT THAT WILL HELP YOU STAY HEALTH

Below are some tips on how you can select good supplements / vitamins that can help you overcome some of your health challenges and help you stay healthy:

1. Serving Size / Dosage

If the supplement is only one serving size per day especially a multivitamin, you are wasting your time. It is not possible for producers of vitamins to pack all the vitamins into one capsule/tablet to complement your healthy diet.

2. When to take a supplement

It is vitally important to take the vitamins at the right time to help optimize your nutrient absorption. Read the label.

3. Quality

Not all vitamins are created equal. Quality of your supplement makes a big difference as to whether it will help you stay healthy. Avoid partial vitamins which are combined with other chemicals. They are completely different from vitamins from whole, real food.

If you remove a part from the whole, you get “synthetic,” “isolated,” or “fractionated” pieces of the whole. it is not the same. Your body cannot absorb synergistically synthetic supplements with bio-availability being the key concern.

Partial vitamins also requires higher dosages to work as well as good natural vitamins. It is like comparing fast food with real whole foods. The nutrient value lost can be more than 50%. Furthermore, these anti-nutrients can deplete the nutritional value of your foods just like cooking can alter the nutritional value of your food.

4. Price has bearing on Quality

Price is usually a good indication if the supplement is of a good quality. If you buy it from a discount store or from a small producer, you do not know if they have good manufacturing practices in place. If it is cheap, it usually means that there is very little R&D that went into the making of the product. For the true value of the product, compare cost per day than cost per bottle.

5. Where you buy your supplements?

Is it a highly reputable company with highest quality control manufacturing practices?

6. RDA (Recommended Daily Allowance and RD (Recommended Daily Intake) guidelines.

The supplement must meet with the specified minimum RDA/RD amounts.

7. Must include added bonus of essential minerals.

These minerals add their unique layer of nutritional support. Many specialised vitamins lack important minerals.

8. Whether it is evaluated by laboratories or received awards.

Labs that provide clinical evaluation of the vitamin or awards are a good indication of the quality of the supplement. Look for research studies to show that the product is clinically proven to support health.

9. Look for manufacturers with a Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) facility.

A GMP facility must comply with rigid standards, the same standards required by pharmaceutical companies as mandated by the FDA.
This assures that what is in the bottle is the same as what is on the label.
Discrepancies happen more often than you might realise!
Recently a study on 55 brands of vitamin D supplements found they contained between 9% – 146% of what was listed on the label!
Next, you want to know that the raw materials are of high quality.

10. Does the manufacturer have a Certificate of Analysis (COA) for each ingredient.

Having a COA means that the raw material is tested by an independent lab and deemed to be contaminant-free.

11. Is it NSF certified.

NSF.org is a respected third-party quality assurance organisation. It verifies that a facility complies with good manufacturing practices, and takes proper steps to ensure product safety and accurate labelling.

12. Other Seals of Approval

Seals of approval from Consumerlab.com, the Natural Products Association (NPA), the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), and others are indicative that the products are the best supplements to take. However, the absence of such a seal is no reflection on quality, either good or bad.

13. Look for transparent labeling.

Some products contain “proprietary formulas” that do not reveal ingredients’ amounts and concentrations.
It should have the herb’s scientific name, plant part, and an expiration date. It’s also nice to see the plant’s place of origin and whether it was grown organically or wild-crafted (picked in the wild). Companies will say they do this to protect their formulations from their competitors, and we understand this. But less-than-reputable companies hide behind these words to conceal the fact that there isn’t enough of specific ingredients to do you any good.

If you have allergies, you should check if it contains soy, nuts, animal products etc.

14. Avoid supplements which contain binders or coatings

Binders and coatings holds the product together so it can be easily swallowed. Also look out for fillers.  Some of these substances may be bad for your health. Research to find out which substances should be avoided.

15. Label Red Flags

Look for “red flags” on labels—Sucrose (sugar), artificial colouring and flavouring, preservatives, and additives such as shellac, chlorine and other chemicals should be avoided. Check to see if it contains hydrogenated oils.
These are usually hidden in the “other ingredients” category. Watch out for meaningless terms like “nutraceutical” which does not add any value to the supplement.

16. Make sure you are getting the therapeutic dosage.

Some companies intentionally add a miniscule amount of an expensive ingredient so they can add it to the label. “Fairy dust” does not give you right amounts of the ingredient for it to be effective in providing a solution to your health.

17. The vitamin must be formulated with a knowledgeable researchers or herbalists.

Buy products from herbalists who understand the required dosages and possible interactions. The americanherbalistsguild provides useful information on various herbs and how they should be used.

18. Beware of Private Label Supplements

These are supplements created by manufacturers based on existing generic supplements. Look for spelling mistakes, no contact numbers, and hype claims about the value of their product to get an indication of the product reliability.

19. Look for a 30 Day Return Policy

Reputable companies will offer a 30 Day money back guarantee.

20. Avoid overly expensive products.

Expensive does not mean that that it is a very good product. If is it over US$100a bottle, you may be paying too much for the product.

21. Look for Standardized Herbal Extracts vs Whole Herbs.

Traditional herbalists prefer the use of whole herbs, also called full spectrum extracts. Standardize extracts usually means the use of harsh chemical solvents to isolate the main active ingredients. Check for Absorption and Bioavailability Rates.

22. Check whether your supplement will dissolve

USP refers to U.S. Pharmacopeia, an organization that was established to create state-of-the-art standards to ensure the quality of medicines that humans use. This includes vitamin and mineral supplements. An example of the kind of USP designation that you want to look for on the label of a product you are considering would be something like, “this product conforms to the USPXXVII requirements for disintegration and dissolution”.

23. Customer feedback

Always be on guard on user comments on social media. Recommendations can be bought. Always read in between the lines of such user recommendations. Comments on Amazon, particularly those who are “Amazon Verified Purchase” are more reliable.  Put more weight age on recommendations from other health professionals.
The Better Business Bureau rating is also a good gauge of whether the company has a good customer rating and low on complaints or legal issues.

24. Expiration Dates

Always look for an expiration date. While some nutrients, such as calcium and other minerals, maintain their potency for several years, others like vitamins B and C have a significantly shorter shelf life. The FDA doesn’t require expiration dates on supplement bottles, so many companies don’t provide them. I do not recommend buying such products. Who knows how long they’ve been sitting on the shelf or warehouse?

25. Are Dietary Supplements Regulated by the Government?

Contrary to popular belief, dietary supplements are regulatory govt organisations eg

  • FDA regulates the manufacturing of supplements (ingredients that can be included in the supplements and the manufacturing practices)
  • FTC regulates the marketing of vitamins and supplements (eg proper labelling and benefit claims of the products).
Reported statistics on ADE on the medications taken in 2004 - due to adverse drug events and poisoning,..
Reported statistics on ADE on the medications taken in 2004 – due to adverse drug events and poisoning,..
Statistics on number of deaths from prescription drugs 2001 - 2013 by males and females as reported by NIH USA
Statistics on number of deaths from prescription drugs 2001 – 2013 by males and females as reported by NIH USA

26. Adverse Reactions to your Vitamins / Supplements

Don’t believe all the propaganda about vitamins and supplements being unsafe. There are very instances of people getting an adverse reaction from alternative medicinal products if you adhere to the label instructions and choose a good quality supplement. If you are worried about adverse reactions on your supplements, you should be even more worried of the medicines that your doctor is prescribing routinely to you. Do careful research on the medications you are taking to assess your risk of adverse reactions, poisoning, and even death which your doctor will not tell you because if you knew, you wouldn’t take them.

Photo of an x-ray taken of a person's colon area with the vertebrae of their backbone off to one side which clearly shows two supplement tablets, still intact.Take high quality supplements.
Photo of an x-ray taken of a person’s colon area with the vertebrae of their backbone off to one side which clearly shows two supplement tablets, still intact, Take high quality supplements.

What if I pick the wrong supplement?

If the vitamin supplement you are considering doesn’t meet the standards discussed above, it can pass right through your body and do you no good at all.

To give you an example of this, I have actually seen a photo of an x-ray taken of a person’s colon area with the vertebrae of their backbone off to one side. In this photo I could clearly see two supplement tablets, still intact, looking like they had just come out of the bottle. These supplement tablets were poorly made, never disintegrated and would soon end up in the toilet. Photos like these are a graphic illustration of the fact that just because you swallow your vitamin supplement doesn’t mean your body is going to be able to use it.

 

FINAL THOUGHTS ON SUPPLEMENTS / VITAMINS

If you have gotten to the point where you are looking for a vitamin and mineral supplement to take, congratulations. You have taken a positive step towards improving your health and taking better care of your body. However, make sure to continue that commitment to yourself by doing your homework and making sure that you choose a good quality supplement. It makes no sense to go that far then end up wasting your money on something that your body can’t even use.

 

Related Post:

Who Takes Supplements | Why
https://teamrich.wordpress.com/2016/06/07/who-takes-supplements-why/

https://teamrich.wordpress.com – Choosing the Right Supplement / Vitamin

Who Takes Supplements | Why

Who Takes Nutritional | Dietary Supplements / Vitamins, and Why?

Who takes supplements and why?
Who takes supplements and why?

WHO TAKES SUPPLEMENTS / VITAMINS, AND WHY?

  • 49% of adults used a supplement of some kind in the prior 30 days: 54% of women, 43% of men.
  • Supplement use increased with age: 34% aged 20-39, 50% age 40-59, and 67% over age 60
  • Non-Hispanic whites use more supplements (54%) than Non-Hispanic blacks (38%) or Hispanics (33%)
  • Supplement use is greater in “never” (51%) or “former” (59%) smokers compared to current smokers (30-36%)
  • Supplement use is much more common in those with health insurance (53%) than those without (31%)
  • Supplement use parallels reported exercise, from “low” (43%) to “moderate” (54%) to “high” (56%).
  • Supplement use was higher among those that reported “excellent” or “very good” health (55%) versus “good” (47%) or fair/poor (44%)

Source on above Supplements and Vitamins Usage Research:
Archives of Internal Medicine (now called JAMA Internal Medicine) was Why US Adults Use Dietary Supplements by Reagan L. Bailey and colleagues from the Office of Dietary Supplements at the National Institutes of Health. It also relies on the NHANES dataset, a representative survey of US civilians which began collecting specific information on reasons for supplement use in 2007. Data are collected through interviews, and a Dietary Supplement Questionnaire was used to gather detailed information on each participant’s use of vitamins and other supplements. This survey reports the results from 11,956 adults (children, young adults (< 20 years), and all pregnant and lactating women were excluded from analysis). Here’s the snapshot of the participants:

Most Popular Reasons People Take Supplements / Vitamins

  • “to feel better” (41%)
  • “to improve your overall energy levels” (41%)
  • “to boost your immune system” (36%)
  • “digestive issues” (28%)
  • “lower cholesterol” (21%)
Top reasons people take suppments - by adults, men, women
Top reasons people take suppments – by adults, men, women

 

Most Popular Types of Supplements / Vitamins

Most Popular Types of Vitamins by Sales
Most Popular Types of Vitamins by Sales

 

Related Post:

CHOOSING THE RIGHT SUPPLEMENT
https://teamrich.wordpress.com/2016/06/10/choosing-the-right-supplement/

 

For more info on Why people take nutritional supplements and vitamins, check out sciencebasedmedicine. for who-takes-dietary-supplements-and-why/

https://teamrich.wordpress.com – Who Takes Nutritional / Dietary Supplements / Vitamins and why?

Toxins hidden in Vitamins Supplements Health Foods

The 10 worst toxins hidden in vitamins, supplements and health foods

– by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger

Image

The 10 worst toxins hidden in vitamins, supplements and health foods

– by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, the Health Ranger

(NaturalNews) I’m absolutely shocked at how many people don’t investigate what’s really in the products they swallow. When something is sold as an herb, vitamin, superfood or supplement, they think it’s automatically safe. And while the natural products industry has a truly remarkable safety record — especially in contrast to the massive number of deaths caused by pharmaceuticals — it still suffers from a lot of hidden toxins that are routinely used throughout the industry.

I know this because I’ve been an investigative journalist and activist in the natural health industry for over a decade. Natural News is arguably the most-read natural health news website in the world, reaching millions of readers a month. I’ve walked the floors of countless trade shows, conducted hundreds of interviews and spent tens of thousands of dollars on laboratory tests to determine what’s in these products. On top of that, I’m deep into organic product formulations and certified organic food production, serving as the supervisor of a USDA-certified organic food production and packing facility.

When I look around the natural products industry, I see examples of super honest, high-integrity companies like Nature’s Path and Dr. Bronner’s. I also see an alarming number of cheats, crooks and charlatans who are only involved in the industry to profit from the explosion of interest in health supplements. In truth, some nutritional products are downright dangerous to your health. My role as a journalist and activist is to help you tell the difference between products that are GOOD for you vs. products that might actually be toxic. Because ultimately, I want you to be healthy, vibrant, intelligent and active. I want you to enjoy life and improve the quality of your life.

Be prepared to be shocked in reading what follows. After reviewing this list, you will probably throw out quite a few products in your refrigerator and pantry. Very few people are willing to tell you the truth revealed here, so some of this may come as a complete shock (see #1 and #2, below).

#1) Maltodextrin (from GM corn)
Let’s start out with the big one first: If you pick up a natural product and the ingredients list says “maltodextrin,” chances are very high that the maltodextrin in the product is derived from Monsanto’s GM corn.

Virtually all the maltodextrin used throughout the natural products industry is genetically modified. Products that are certified USDA organic, however, are not using GMO maltodextrin.

The non-GMO, non-corn replacement for maltodextrin derived from GM corn is tapioca maltodextrin, and you’ll find tapioca starch / maltodextrin in many certified organic, non-GMO products. Corn maltodextrin should be avoided unless it’s certified USDA organic. Look for tapioca maltodextrin instead (or no maltodextrin at all).

#2) Vitamin C / acorbic acid (from GM corn)
Here’s another whopper that’s sure to open some eyes: Nearly all the “vitamin C” sold in vitamins across America right now is derived from GMO corn.

This means that many of the supplements sold at Whole Foods, the vitamins sold on Amazon.com, the pills at your local pharmacy, and especially the products at the grocery store are (nearly) all routinely made with genetically modified vitamin C. It’s typically called “ascorbic acid,” and nearly 100% of the ascorbic acid used in the natural products industry is derived from GMOs.

Sourcing non-GMO vitamin C requires you to go outside the United States. There is no existing supply chain of certified organic, non-GMO ascorbic acid available anywhere in America (at least not to my knowledge). You can’t even run batches of non-GMO ascorbic acid production in the USA because all the facilities are contaminated with residues of GM corn.

Rest assured that all those cheap “vitamin C” pills sold at retail are derived from genetically modified corn.

#3) Hexane-extracted soy and rice proteins
Nearly 100% of the “natural” soy proteins and rice proteins sold in the USA are extracted in China using a hexane extraction method. This is true for brown rice protein superfoods as well as the soy protein used in nearly all so-called “protein bars.”

Here’s a list of many of the protein bar brands currently using soy protein:
http://www.naturalnews.com/032862_soy_protein_food_bars.html

Hexane is a highly explosive chemical. It is not only extremely hazardous to the environment, there may also be trace amounts of hexane left remaining in the resulting protein products. My understanding is that hexane extraction is not allowed in certified organic proteins, so if you have a choice, go for certified organic instead of just “natural” (which means nothing anyway).

Hexane extraction, by the way, is also used in the manufacture of textured vegetable protein (TVP). Read more about TVP here:
http://www.naturalnews.com/033728_TVP_textured_vegetable_protein.html

#4) High levels of Aluminum in detox products
Natural News helped expose high aluminum levels (over 1200ppm) in a popular detox liquid, causing the main U.S. distributor to issue a “recall” notice and provide over $1 million in refunds to customers.

The manufacturer of this product, Adya Clarity, intentionally and knowingly deceived consumers by mislabeling the product and not mentioning the 1200ppm of aluminum it contained. The FDA seized some of the products and ran its own lab tests, confirming the high aluminum level as well as identifying multiple labeling violations.

Adya Clarity is just one of many so-called “detox” products containing alarming levels of aluminum and other metals. Ingesting these in order to “detox” your body may be harmful to your health. This experience also proves you can’t always trust health products sold through online webinars, where manufacturers can ignore labeling laws and fabricate false claims. Buyer beware when it comes to metals in detox products that claim seemingly magical results.

#5) Lead and arsenic in herbs from China
China is the most polluted nation on the planet (by far), yet many fruits, vegetables and herbs are grown in China and exported to North America for use in natural products.

High levels of lead and arsenic are routinely found in various food, supplement and herbal products from China. I’m not concerned about 1ppm or lower, by the way, of heavy metals like lead and mercury. Even aluminum isn’t necessarily a problem when found organically grown inside foods that test at higher levels such as 150ppm. But when lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium get to high saturation levels (or are present in inorganic forms), it makes the products potentially a source of heavy metals poisoning for consumers.

Astonishingly, many of the small and medium-sized companies that import and retail products from China conduct no metals testing whatsoever. I know this as a fact because I’ve talked to people doing this.

For the record, everything packed under my own brand name (Health Ranger Select) and sold at the Natural News Store is independently tested by us to ensure full product safety and regulatory compliance.

#6) Inorganic minerals in cheap vitamins
Would you eat iron filings and call it nutrition? The majority of people don’t know that most of the cheap vitamins sold today are made with iron filings. “Scrap metal,” almost.

The calcium found in cheap vitamins is often just ground-up seashells, and magnesium is often sold as cheap magnesium oxide which may be completely useless to your body’s cells. If you’re buying mineral supplements, you may be wasting your money unless the minerals are in the right form: Magnesium orotate or malate, for example.

When it comes to mineral supplements, you’ll often find trace levels of scary things like barium and lead in liquid supplements, but these are typically at such low levels (ppb) that they are no real concern. But the No. 1 best source for all minerals is, not surprisingly, fresh plants. If you really want to boost your minerals, feed ’em to sprouts or garden plants, then eat or juice those plants. Your body wants “organic” minerals from plants, not inorganic minerals from rocks.

#7) Carrageenan?
The Cornucopia Institute, a highly-effective food activism group that we’ve long supported, recently published a warning about carrageenan in foods. Cornucopia says carrageenan is linked to “gastrointestinal inflammation, including higher rates of colon cancer, in laboratory animals.”

It goes on to report:

Given its effect on gastrointestinal inflammation, Cornucopia urges anyone suffering from gastrointestinal symptoms (irritable bowel syndrome/IBS, spastic colon, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic diarrhea, etc.) to consider completely eliminating carrageenan from the diet to determine if carrageenan was a factor in causing the symptoms.

Personally, I have never had any problem with carrageenan, and given that it’s derived from seaweed, I also didn’t mind the source. I actually consume quite a lot of carrageenan in Blue Diamond almond milk, which I drink when I’m too busy to make my own raw almond milk. And I’ve never had a problem with it whatsoever. So from my personal experience, I don’t see carrageenan as a worrisome ingredient, but I do understand that some people experience it differently, and it may be troublesome for people whose digestive systems are more sensitive than my own.

For the record, I definitely don’t consider carrageenan to be anywhere near as worrisome as, say, aspartame, GMOs or MSG.

#8) Acrylamides
Acrylamides are cancer-causing chemicals produced during the cooking of carbohydrates. Fried snack chips, for example, contain acrylamides. They don’t have to be listed on labels because they are technically not “ingredients.” They are chemicals produced during cooking or frying. Consuming acrylamides increases kidney cancer risk by 59 percent.

The FDA has published an extensive reference guide on acrylamide levels in foods, revealing that french fries have the highest levels of all. But they are also present in prune juice and even breakfast cereals.

A bag of organic snack chips can have just as many acrylamides as a bag of conventional snack chips. This is why fried snack chips should be eaten only sparingly, or never at all. I’m guilty of eating some of these chips myself from time to time, but I limit the quantity and make sure I’m taking chlorella or other superfoods at the same time to counteract the acrylamides.

Interestingly, it turns out that vitamin C blocks acrylamides from causing damage to your body. But if your vitamin C is from a GMO source (see above), you may want to rethink that strategy. Natural citrus juice, rose hips or even camu camu berry powder is a much better choice of natural, full-spectrum vitamin C.

If you eat fried foods of any kind, make sure you ingest a lot of vitamin C, astaxanthin and chlorella before and after your meal or snack.

#9) Hidden MSG / yeast extract
Hidden MSG is a huge issue across the natural products industry. Pick up almost any veggie burger, and you’ll find it’s made with yeast extract, a hidden form of MSG (monosodium glutamate).

Yeast extract is unbelievably prevalent in the food industry because it looks nicer on the label than “MSG.” Most people are trained to avoid MSG, but yeast extract slips by, so food manufacturers put it into canned soups, dip mixes, snack chips, microwave dinners and especially in vegetarian products, many of which are so loaded with chemicals and additives that I won’t dare touch them. Just because a food says “vegetarian” doesn’t mean it’s healthy.

Hidden MSG is also labeled as “autolyzed yeast extract” or “torula yeast” or even “hydrolyzed vegetable protein.

#10) Fluoride in green tea
Green tea is famous for being contaminated with high levels of fluoride. This is frustrating, because green tea is phenomenally good for your health. It has been proven to lower “bad” cholesterol levels, and it may even help prevent cancer and neurological disorders. It’s probably one of the healthiest beverages you can ever drink.

The tea plant that produces green tea just happens to uptake a huge amount of fluoride from the soils. So when there’s fluoride present in those soils, the green tea will have a surprisingly high concentration, sometimes as much as 25ppm.

An interesting article on this issue is found at Toxipedia.org:
http://toxipedia.org/display/toxipedia/Fluoride+Content+in+Tea

While this fluoride in green tea might not be a health hazard all by itself, the governments of the world seem insistent on pumping even more synthetic, chemical fluoride into the water supplies, thereby creating a high risk for fluorosis. Adding green tea to the fluoride consumption you might experience from tap water is a recipe for disaster: brittle bones, discoloration of teeth and even cancer.

The final “dirty little secret” of the natural products industry
Finally, there’s one more secret you need to know about. Most importers, packers, vendors and retailers of natural products foolishly trust the lab results provided by the manufacturers and exporters!

So a typical U.S. company that sells, for example, pomegranate powder on the internet may never conduct their own tests for lead, mercury, cadmium, arsenic and aluminum. They will simply take the lab tests provided by the manufacturer and consider those to be absolute fact!

This is extraordinarily foolish. Growers and exporters routinely lie about their lab tests in order to pull the wool over the eyes of importers, formulators and retailers. The lab tests are easily faked or simply bought off in their home country. Contaminated products can be easily sold and exported because the FDA doesn’t routinely check imported raw materials for heavy metals contamination.

On the good news side, I do know for a fact that all the higher-end retailers such as Natural News, Mercola, Gary Null, etc., all routinely test their raw materials for contaminants. I’m pretty sure Gaia herbs (www.GaiaHerbs.com) routinely tests all their batches, and I know that VitaCost, before it changed hands a few years ago, was running their own lab to test raw materials on-site (for their in-house formulations). But I also know of smaller retailers who absolutely do not test anything and are far more interested in moving boxes than knowing what’s really in them. I also know that some operations are claiming to sell “organic” products even though they do not have any kind of organic certification, and that’s an irresponsible practice that should be rectified. (Look for the USDA organic logo when you buy “organic” products. If they don’t have the logo, they aren’t really organic.)

So once again, buyer beware. You need to be asking for lab test results on anything from China, and it’s good to ask for them on just about everything else as well. For our part, Natural News Store is already in the process of building a mechanism where we can post lab results for all the batches we import, pack and retail. We reject anything with high levels of metals, which is why it took us so many months to secure a really clean source of chlorella.
http://www.chlorellafactor.com/

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/039638_toxins_ingredients_nutritional_supplements.html#ixzz2OdLmxwvN