Top Irradiated Foods To Avoid

Top Irradiated Foods To Avoid

Irradiated Food - How safe are they?
Irradiated Food – How safe are they?

The list of radiated foods differs by country, as each state has its own policies and processes. In the U.S.A., the list of affected foods includes the following, which are most likely to be irradiated:

  • Many spices and vegetable seasonings:
  • White potatoes
  • Wheat, flour, wheat powder
  • Fresh produce
  • Fresh meat and poultry of all kinds

 

Foods treated with gamma-radiation are marked with the international symbol for irradiation:

Radura - an international symbol that the food has been irradiated with a high dosage of electromagnetic / ionizing radiation rays
Radura – an international symbol that the food has been irradiated with a high dosage of electromagnetic / ionizing radiation rays

And should, in the United States, contain the words “Treated with Radiation,” or “Treated by Irradiation,” on the package.

Countries that Irradiate their foods
Countries that Irradiate their foods

Countries that Irradiate their Foods

Below is a list of the countries that either use irradiation for commercial use or have approved food irradiation.

Asia
– Bangladesh
– China
– India
– Indonesia
– Iran
– Japan
– Korea
– Thailand

Africa
– Algeria
– South Africa

South America
– Argentina
– Brazil
– Chile
– Peru

Black Flag: Countries with Commercial Irradiation of Food

Europe
– Belgium
– Croatia
– Czech Republic
– Denmark
– Finland
– France
– Germany
– Hungary
– Israel
– Netherlands
– Norway
– Poland
– Ukraine
– United Kingdom
– Yugoslavia

North America
– Canada
– Cuba
– Mexico
– United States

Yellow Flag: Countries with Approval of Food Irradiation

Asia
– Pakistan
– Phillippines
– Russian Federation
– Syria
Europe
– Italy
– Spain

South America
– Costa Rica
– Uruguay

How do I know if my food is irradiated?
How do I know if my food is irradiated?

How Will I Know if My Food Has Been Irradiated?

FDA requires that irradiated foods bear the international symbol for irradiation. Look for the Radura symbol along with the statement “Treated with radiation” or “Treated by irradiation” on the food label.

Bulk foods, such as fruits and vegetables, are required to be individually labelled or to have a label next to the sale container.

FDA does not require that individual ingredients in multi-ingredient foods (e.g., spices) be labelled.

Irradiated Food will still require proper food-handling practices
Irradiated Food will still require proper food-handling practices

It is important to remember that irradiation is not a replacement for proper food-handling practices by producers, processors and consumers. Irradiated foods need to be stored, handled and cooked in the same way as non-irradiated foods, because they could still become contaminated with disease-causing organisms after irradiation if the rules of basic food safety are not followed.

 

What Foods Have Been Approved for Irradiation?
What Foods Have Been Approved for Irradiation?

FDA has approved a variety of foods for irradiation in the United States including:

  • Beef and Pork
  • Crustaceans (e.g., lobster, shrimp, and crab)
  • Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
  • Lettuce and Spinach
  • Molluscan Shellfish (e.g., oysters, clams, mussels, and scallops)
  • Poultry
  • Seeds for Sprouting (e.g., for alfalfa sprouts)
  • Shell Eggs
  • Spices and Seasonings

 

 

Why Irradiate Food?
Why Irradiate Food?

Why Irradiation of Food

FDA says that Irradiated Food serves the following objectives:

  • Prevention of Foodborne Illness – irradiation can be used to effectively eliminate organisms that cause foodborne illness, such as Salmonella and Escherichia coli (E. coli).
  • Preservation – irradiation can be used to destroy or inactivate organisms that cause spoilage and decomposition and extend the shelf life of foods.
  • Control of Insects – irradiation can be used to destroy insects in or on tropical fruits imported into the United States. Irradiation also decreases the need for other pest-control practices that may harm the fruit.
  • Delay of Sprouting and Ripening – irradiation can be used to inhibit sprouting (e.g., potatoes) and delay ripening of fruit to increase longevity.
  • Sterilization – irradiation can be used to sterilize foods, which can then be stored for years without refrigeration. Sterilized foods are useful in hospitals for patients with severely impaired immune systems, such as patients with AIDS or undergoing chemotherapy. Foods that are sterilized by irradiation are exposed to substantially higher levels of treatment than those approved for general use.
Irradiate Food - most of it is unlabelled at the store shelves
Irradiate Food – most of it is unlabelled at the store shelves

The Dangers of Food Irradiation

What’s Wrong with Food Irradiation?

Irradiation damages the quality of food.

Foods that have been exposed to ionizing radiation compromises their nutrition and freshness especially vitamins C, E, K and B Complex. It destroys the antioxidant effect in foods exposing you to harmful free radicals. Irradiation it creates dirty food.

Irradiation produces toxic byproducts in the food.

New new radiolytic products, some of which are toxic (benzene, formaldehyde, lipid peroxides) may be created which can lead to increased tumors, reproductive failures and kidney damage. Chromosomal abnormalities occurred in children from India who were fed freshly irradiated wheat.

Irradiation using radioactive materials is an environmental hazard.

Leakage of radioactive water from processing plants and transport vehicles will have a big impact on the ecosystem. The clean up costs will be exhorbitant, not counting human medical costs from this pollution as we have found out from Georgia and New Jersey.

Irradiation is a quick fix with long-term consequences.

Irradiation doesn’t kill all bacteria; those that survive are radiation-resistant. Eventually these bacteria will require higher doses of radiation. Irradiation doesn’t kill the bacterium that causes botulism, or viruses. It can’t be used on dairy products, a major source of food poisoning.

Irradiation doesn’t solve the problem, it just covers it up.

In a 1997 CBS nationwide poll, 77% of US consumers did not want irradiated food. This public resistance is why food trade associations have been plotting to eliminate all requirements for labelling irradiated food.

There are better ways of maintaining clean and sustainable food. Cleaning up filthy slaughter houses, slowing down processing lines, increasing the number of federal meat inspectors, and encouraging local and organic agriculture instead of factory farming are just a few proposals that can lead to long-term food safety solutions without the risks of irradiation.

Possible risks of the poisoning of food through irradiation
Possible risks of the poisoning of food through irradiation

The Alternative to Irradiated Food

The best way to avoid irradiated food is to eat organic foods {click this link to organic foods)

The best way to avoid irradiated food is to eat organic

https://teamrich.wordpress.com – Irradiated Foods by Nancy Long